Pixop offers a number of different filters and settings for processing, and finding the right combination of them can understandably be overwhelming to someone without a ton of video editing or post-production experience.

So in an effort to make things as simple as possible, we've created a number of different factory presets to make it easier for you to get the best results for your footage – and fast!

factory presets menu on Pixop interface

What follows is a brief explainer on each one.

Mov/H.264

Use this preset along with our trim tool to create 10-second samples of parts of your original footage to test different filter and settings combinations.

Enhanced HD

Use this setting if you have low-quality SD footage that you want to upscale to HD. This preset applies the generic variant of Deep Restoration 2 to denoise, deblur and upscale your footage.

Enhanced UHD 4K

Use this setting if you have low-quality HD footage that you want to upscale to 4K. This preset applies the generic variant of Deep Restoration 2 to denoise, deblur and upscale your footage.

Enhanced, no upscaling

Use this setting on low-quality footage that you do not want to upscale. This preset applies the generic variant of Deep Restoration 2 to denoise and deblur your footage, without upscaling it.

HQ input, enhanced HD

Use this setting on high-quality SD footage that you want to upscale to HD. This preset applies the fine-tuning variant of Deep Restoration 2 to upscale your footage, without deblurring or denoising, which allows you to retain fine details and textures.

HQ input, enhanced UHD 4K

Use this setting if you have high-quality HD footage that you want to upscale to 4K. This preset applies the fine-tuning variant of Deep Restoration 2 to upscale your footage, without deblurring or denoising, which allows you to retain fine details and textures.

HQ input, enhanced, no upscaling

Use this setting on high-quality footage that you do not want to upscale. This preset applies the fine tuning variant of Deep Restoration 2 to resolve details in video degraded by lossy compression without upscaling it.

A note on high-quality versus low-quality footage

The presets listed above all depend on whether the original footage is high-quality or low-quality. To some extent, 'quality' is subjective and making the distinction requires taking both automated analysis and human subjective opinion into account. To make it easier for you to identify whether you are working with high-quality or low-quality footage, use our 'quality analysis' tool.

This tool automatically evaluates and then rates your video on noise, details and colors. It then assigns a score of 5. The higher the combined score, the better the quality you are working with.

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P.S. If you run into difficulties or have any questions, please reach out to us here or at help@pixop.com — happy to help 🤓

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